Then and now: Austin celebrates anniversary of marriage equality

People celebrate the Supreme Court decision to legalize same-sex marriage in Austin, Texas on Friday, June 26, 2016. Shelby Tauber / AMERICAN-STATESMAN
People celebrate the Supreme Court decision to legalize same-sex marriage in Austin, Texas on Friday, June 26, 2016. Shelby Tauber / AMERICAN-STATESMAN

Austin on June 26, 2015 was a day full of LGBT pride, celebrations in the streets and impromptu weddings — it’s the day the U.S. Supreme Court overturned state bans on gay marriage, requiring all states to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples and recognize such unions performed in other states.

Sunday marked one year since the Obergefell v. Hodge ruling, and Austinites came out to celebrate. Couples like Collin Acock and Shane Parsons reflected on the historic day while also celebrating their wedding anniversary. Groups like Equality Texas used the anniversary as a day to call on the LGBT community to fight against discrimination.

In honor of the anniversary, take a look back at the day SCOTUS made history and the events surrounding the decision.

 

For complete coverage of gay marriage in Texas, go here. 

 

Smells like Texas spirit: 20 scents that will remind you of the Lone Star state

Bluebonnets grow along a county road between Spicewood, Texas and Lake Travis. LAURA SKELDING/AMERICAN-STATESMAN
Bluebonnets grow along a county road between Spicewood, Texas and Lake Travis. LAURA SKELDING/AMERICAN-STATESMAN

It’s only natural to become homesick the second you leave our great state of Texas. Who can blame you when there are so many things to love?

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The “Texas Homesick Candle” emits a fragrance that includes leather, fresh cotton and sage. Photo via Homesick Candles.

And they say our sense of smell is linked closely with memory which is probably why a number of people have tried to capture the Lone Star state’s scent and put it into a candle.  There’s this “Texas Homesick Candle” that smells like leather, fresh cotton and sage. There are also these candles by UT alumna Pam Kuhl-Linscomb named after Texas cities or True Texas Scents on Etsy that include scents like Amaretto and sagebrush.

But even with all these nostalgia-inducing scents, we thought some iconic smells were missing. Here are the Texas fragrances we’d also opt to put into our candles:

1. Barbecue. The aroma of freshly cooked meats is more than welcome in our homes.

2. Little Texas Mountain Laurels.

3. All the smells of the State Fair. Basically anything deep fried, from funnel cakes to turkey legs.

4. Tobacco. Specifically the chewing kind.

5. Sweet Tea and all its sugary glory.

6. Diesel because we all grew up around large trucks and probably still have one in the family.

7. In fact, let’s just amp that Diesel up to the scent of oil. It’s everywhere here.

8. Bluebonnets, obviously.

9. The odiously cheesy scent of queso. Or all Tex-Mex scents really. Imagine a candle that smelled like tortillas on a hot stove. Yum.

10. Some smoky hints of gun powder.

11. Fresh Whataburger. You’d probably crave the fast food everyday.

12. Rain in the summer. When it’s not unbearably dry at least.

13. Shiner beer, with tinges of prickly pear and strawberry blonde.

14. Scents of the ocean because Texas has quite a few iconic beaches, from Galveston to South Padre Island.

15. Livestock. Not a pretty thought but we are the Longhorn state.

16. Whiskey.

17.  Pecans. Pecan trees, pecan pies, pecan candles…

18. Crops. Really just the smell of fresh outdoors not ridden with city smells.

19. Chili.

20. And considering Texas’ funky weather, if we make a candle that could emit the scents of every season in the course of a burn, that’d be ideal.

Of course not all of these would make for appealing fragrances but home is where the heart is — not the nose.