Austin’s emergency management office lauded, earns elite accreditation

American-Statesman file photo

A national nonprofit group lauded Austin’s emergency management efforts Friday, certifying its program meets 64 industry standards.

Austin is just one of three Texas cities, along with Dallas and Arlington, to win accreditation from the national Emergency Management Accreditation Program.

“Emergency management accreditation represents a significant achievement,” said EMAP Commission Chairperson Robie Robinson in a statement. “We applaud the City of Austin’s leadership and we recognize the dedication to the safety and security of the residents that it represents.”

The city’s 15-member Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Management plans and prepares for emergencies, educates the public about preparedness, and manages grant funding to improve homeland security and public safety. The agency co-manages the Austin-Travis County Emergency Operations Center.

 

Black Lives Matter demonstrators, counter-protesters come together with police in Dallas

Counter protester Joseph Offutt, left, holds an American flag in a group of counter protesters standing across from a Black Lives Matter demonstration on Park Lane in Dallas, Sunday, July 10, 2016. (Jae S. Lee/The Dallas Morning News via AP)
Counter protester Joseph Offutt, left, holds an American flag in a group of counter protesters standing across from a Black Lives Matter demonstration on Park Lane in Dallas, Sunday, July 10, 2016. (Jae S. Lee/The Dallas Morning News via AP)

A group of Black Lives Matter demonstrators and a group of counter-protesters began Sunday afternoon standing on separate sides of a street in northeast Dallas —but by day’s end, the two groups were exchanging hugs and support.

Dallas Morning News reports that the Black Lives Matter group dressed in all black, marching across U.S. Highway 75 chanting “too black, too strong” in wake of recent shootings across the nation. They took position across from the counter-protesters who waved an American flag, Texas flags and a black-and-blue flag in honor of police.

After about an hour of exchanging angry words with one another, group leaders met in the middle as Sgt. Jeff Hall, a 27-year veteran of the Dallas Police Department acted as a mediator.

The two reached an agreement and brought their groups together, exchanging names, handshakes and hugs. CNN reports that before the protesters went home, they huddled together to say a prayer — including one police officer who had initially been keeping the groups separate.

“Today, we’re going to show the rest of the country how we came together,” said the counter-protest’s representative. “We’re going to leave our mark on history today.”

Related link: Everyone is talking about this photo from the protests in Baton Rouge

 

People around Texas work lemonade stands to support officers, families

13905181933_740fdfde4f_b
Photo via Flickr

After the deadly attack in downtown Dallas on Thursday, families all around Texas have started working lemonade stands in support of police officers.

KVUE reports that Wimberley’s seven-year-old Chloe Diaz offered free lemonade and hugs to first responders on Friday. Though she usually works her stand to raise money for Jared Allen’s Homes for Wounded Warriors, she wanted to help out after Thursday’s shooting.

“They save our country so that’s why I did that,” she said.

According to KHOU, six-year-old Charlie Argo from Burleson set up a lemonade stand at his house on Saturday so that friends, family and neighbors could help him raise money. All $2,400 that were raised went toward the Russ Martin Listeners Foundation — a fund that supports the families  of Dallas and Fort Worth police officers and firefighters that have fallen in the line of duty.

Fox4 reports a group of young girls in Dallas raised $5,000 to support police officers, selling lemonade brownies and cookies.

“At first it was just a lemonade stand and then what happened to the police in downtown Dallas made me realize that families out there were in need of money,” said Landry Nelon, one of the girls who organized the effort.

There were also lemonade stands in Bexar County and Keller.

 

Army vet from Texas called ‘dirty little immigrant’ by British men in video

LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 28: Protesters gather on College Green in front of the Houses of Parliament as they demonstrate against the EU referendum result on June 28, 2016 in London, England. Up to 50,000 people were expected before the event was cancelled due to safety concerns. Early evening up to 2000 people have still converged on the square and then marched to Parliament to vent their anti-Brexit feelings. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
Protesters gather on College Green in front of the Houses of Parliament as they demonstrate against the EU referendum result on June 28, 2016 in London, England.Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

For 18 years, U.S. Army veteran Juan Jasso has called the U.K. his home. So when he was riding the tram in Manchester, England on Tuesday morning, he never expected to be called a “dirty little immigrant.”

A video of three young British men insulting and threatening Jasso, who is a Mexican-American Texas-native from Brownsville, quickly spread, becoming an example of xenophobic sentiments affecting immigrants in the U.K in the days following “Brexit.”

According to The New York Times, the 38-year-old is a lecturer at The Manchester College, a vocational school where he teaches in the sports science department. He is a former rugby coach and was once a signals intelligence analyst for the U.S. Army.

Jasso said he had addressed the three men, whose ages are 20, 18 and 16, at the back of the tram to ask them to watch their language since there were women and children on board.

The video begins with one of the men calling Jasso a “muppet,” saying “get of the tram now, I’ll waste you, I’ll waste anyone. Don’t talk when you’re not even from England, you dirty immigrant.”

“How old are you?” Jasso responds. “What are you, 18, 19? I’ve been here longer than you have.”

“Get back to Africa,” the man says.

“You are extremely ignorant and not very intelligent,” Jasso says. That’s when the men start walking toward Jasso and one of them throws beer on him. That’s when others on the tram step in.

One woman can be heard telling the men “you’re a disgrace. An absolute disgrace. You’re a disgrace to England.”

According to the Greater Manchester Police’s Facebook, the authorities arrested the three man on Tuesday on suspicion of affray.

He told the Times that Manchester is a multicultural and tolerant city and doesn’t think what happened to him is an accurate reflection of the city.

“What happened is not the Britain I know and that I have come to call home,” he said.

Here’s how people on social media have expressed their support of Jasso.

https://twitter.com/YanJones89/status/747892009466212353?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw