Mayor Adler sends tongue-in-cheek response to man upset over ‘Wonder Woman’ screening

Austin Mayor Steve Adler used a witty approach Wednesday in responding to an email he received last week, in which the writer voiced his opposition to the Alamo Drafthouse Cinema’s plans to host two women-only screenings of the movie “Wonder Woman” on Tuesday.

GAL GADOT as Diana in the action adventure “WONDER WOMAN,” a Warner Bros. Pictures release.

The writer called for a male boycott of the entire city of Austin.

“I hope every man will boycott Austin and do what he can to diminish Austin and to cause damage to the city’s image,” he wrote. “The theater that pandered to the sexism typical of women will, I hope, regret it’s [sic] decision. The notion of a woman hero is a fine example of women’s eagerness to accept the appearance of achievement without actual achievement.”

You can read the rest of his musings here – because Adler posted the exchange on his blog – if you’re interested in hearing the writer’s thoughts on makeup, military service, the Olympics, inventors and the “women’s movement.”

Adler decided to alert the writer “that your email account has been hacked by an unfortunate and unusually hostile individual.”

“Please remedy your account’s security right away, lest this person’s uninformed and sexist rantings give you a bad name,” Adler wrote. “After all, we men have to look out for each other!”

In response to the writer’s – possibly rhetorical – request to “name something invented by a woman,” Adler noted that “women invented medical syringes, life rafts, fire escapes, central and solar heating, a war-time communications system for radio-controlling torpedoes that laid the technological foundations for everything from Wi-Fi to GPS, and beer.”

Adler wished the writer luck in securing his email account.

“I hesitate to imagine how embarrassed you’d be if someone thought you were upset that a private business was realizing a business opportunity by reserving one screening this weekend for women to see a superhero movie,” Adler wrote.

This isn’t the first time Adler has used his blog to counteract hostile rants from members of the public. Last year, after voters defeated a referendum on ride-hailing rules that led to Uber and Lyft leaving town, Adler put up a post featuring some of the most profane tweets he had received on the topic. His spokesman said that post “speaks for itself and quite loudly.”

Is Austin home to millennial ‘slackers’? Yes, but not as much as other Texas cities

The Pew Research Center found last year that the current generation of 18-to-34-year-olds (millennials) are more likely to be currently living with their parents than to be living with a spouse or significant other, or living alone or with roommates, for the first time in 130 years.

From Flickr user Elizabeth Hahn. Used with Creative Commons license.

Apartment search site Abodo took that Pew data and found that 34.1 percent of millennials across America are still living under mom and dad’s roof. To understand why, Adobo looked at 16 metropolitan statistical areas (cities with populations over 1 million people) that exceeded the national average.

The results? Austin isn’t as much of a slacker city as you might think.

Related: I’m a millennial. I don’t need your participation trophy.

The Austin-Round Rock area landed at the bottom of Adobo’s list at No. 40, with 22.3 percent of the city’s millennials still living at home. That’s 11.8 percent below the national average. And, just 8 percent of Austin’s millennials are unemployed, compared to the 10 percent national average.

Austin millennials are also raking in more money than the national average, whether they live at home or not; those living at home took in $1,314 a month, while those living on their own or with other people took in $2,329 a month. Unsurprisingly, the housing market in Austin isn’t kind to millennials. They pay almost $200 more than the national average in median rent.

More: When it comes to this list of heavyweights, San Antonio is way ahead of Austin

The area with the highest population of millennials living at home is the Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, Fla. area, with 44.8 percent of that area’s millennials living at home. The largest contingent of stay-at-home-kids in Texas is in the San Antonio-New Braunfels area, at 36.2 percent.

We want to see your most Texan picture on Texas Independence Day

Got a picture that perfectly captures how happy you are to live in the Lone Star State? This Texas Independence Day, send all photographic evidence of just how truly Texan you are to readerphotos@statesman.com or tweet us @statesman.

tex180horiz
Photo by Dave Thomas/Austin-American Statesman

If you don’t have the perfect picture in mind, we’re unopposed to taking one just for the occasion. Bust out your boots, grab a Shiner, pull up a patch of bluebonnets, and remind everyone who doesn’t know just why Texans are so proud to be just that.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, TEXAS: Here’s 181 things we love about you

Ranking: Austin is No. 1 ‘super cool’ city, thanks to SXSW and food

 

Austin is weird. Austin is the best capital city to live in, according to U.S. News and World Report. Austin’s restaurants land on many year-end “best-of” lists. Austin is one of America’s most generous cities, according to GoFundMe.

rbz-city-skyline-01

And now, a new list from Expedia ranks Austin as the “coolest U.S. city.”

The travel company ranked 21 cities, giving points based on attributes like the availability of a Lyft ride, the amount of farmer’s markets in the city, low crime rating, music/arts/food/drink festivals and population age.

Austin was the only Texas city to make the cut. It scored a 26 out of a possible 28 points by Expedia’s scale, and the company found plenty to like about the Lone Star State’s capital city.

More: Spring break destinations? New York Times recommends Austin

“The only uncool thing about Austin can be the weather, and it takes care of that with awesome watering holes (ahem, Barton Springs), cool places to crash (hotels like Kimpton Hotel Van Zandt), and killer cold treats (Lick Ice Cream, anyone?),” Austin’s description on the list reads.

Other highlights of living in Austin, according to Expedia:

  • A crime rating of 35 out of 100, according to Sperling’s Best Places
  • A great restaurant scene
  • South By Southwest Festival, Art City Austin and the Mexican Experience
  • South Congress’ shopping district (which is growing smaller by the day)

However, some parts of Austin aren’t that “cool” to the people who live here. A recent New York Times article says that “the coolness factor” that drives many startups and hip bars to build in East Austin is what’s leading to the rapid gentrification of the city’s east side.

Plus, there’s always the traffic, which any longtime Austinite will blame on the rapid influx of Californian transplants.

 

 

Study: Austin one of America’s hardest-working cities

Jesus Gonzalez works on a frame of a new home in the Blackhawk subdivision in Pflugerville early Wednesday morning Oct. 7, 2015 during cool temperatures at sun rise. (RICARDO B. BRAZZIELL / AMERICAN-STATESMAN)
Jesus Gonzalez works on a frame of a new home in the Blackhawk subdivision in Pflugerville early Wednesday morning Oct. 7, 2015 during cool temperatures at sun rise. (RICARDO B. BRAZZIELL / AMERICAN-STATESMAN)

Austin might be the fabled home to the hippies and slackers, but a recent study by a personal finance website placed the Texas capital in the top 20 of “2017’s Hardest-Working Cities in America.”

The WalletHub study ranked Austin No. 17 on the list, which was topped by Anchorage, Alaska. Austin fell short of industrious Plano (No. 2), Irving (No.5) and even Corpus Christi (No. 8), but was well ahead of San Antonio (No. 44) and Lubbock (No. 93).

(Coming in last place among the 116 largest cities was Burlington, Vermont.)

RELATED: AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN TOP WORKPLACES 2016

A similar WalletHub study placed Austin at No. 22 on a list of The Best Cities for Jobs. Unsurprisingly, Detroit came in last in the study.

Single men and women can’t afford to buy a home in Austin, according to study

It’s not news that homes in Austin cost a pretty penny. In fact, we just reported on a recent study revealing Austinites have to make at least $52,578 to afford a home in the city.

Another new study from Property Shark reveals it’s even harder to buy a home in Austin if you’re buying one alone — that is, if you’re unmarried or otherwise unattached (or if you don’t have a friend or family member to go halfsies with on a new home).

The Austin skyline as seen looking northwest from the Lakeshore area showing the Roy and Ann Butler Hike and Bike Trail on Lady Bird Lake August 31, 2016. RALPH BARRERA/AMERICAN-STATESMAN
The Austin skyline as seen looking northwest from the Lakeshore area showing the Roy and Ann Butler Hike and Bike Trail on Lady Bird Lake August 31, 2016.
RALPH BARRERA/AMERICAN-STATESMAN

The organizers of the study gathered information on home prices and rents across the 50 largest cities in the United States and compared that information to the average incomes of men and women in the city. Then the study used the housing industry “rule” of spending no more than 30 percent of income on either mortgage payments or rent to determine whether single men and women could afford a home in each city.

It resulted in what Property Shark called a “rather bleak picture of the urban housing market,” with women disproportionately affected due to the fact that women earn significantly less than men,  making it more difficult for women to afford living alone.

However, the study revealed that neither gender can afford to buy a home in Austin, one of 14 cities that have priced out single men and women completely. It’s bad news for renters, too — the study showed neither gender can afford to rent their own one-bedroom apartment in Austin either, according to the 30 percent rule (though we’re aware that many Austinites break this rule).

Image via Property Shark
Image via Property Shark

Austin was the only Texas city on the list to have completely rendered single men and women unable to buy a home, but Fort Worth and Houston were among the nine cities with the biggest difference in average income between genders, making it easier for men to buy homes than women.

So what are the best U.S. cities to find an affordable home? Atlanta, Las Vegas and the three largest cities in Arizona – Phoenix, Tucson and Mesa – are good for both genders, the study says. For women buying homes, Detroit comes in first place, with homeowners spending only 4 percent of their income on monthly payments, followed by Witchita, Kan. and Indianapolis, Ind. Arlington, Texas is sixth on the list of most affordable cities for women.

If there’s any good news in all of this, it’s that rental rates are stabilizing in Austin, providing relief for those who rent apartments. The average monthly apartment rent in Austin is about $1,000 per month for a one-bedroom apartment and $1,300 for a two-bedroom apartment.

Austin is the nation’s best capital city to live in, according to online list

 

Shortly after Austin was named the “best place to live in America” by U.S. News and World Report, the city has landed atop another list of best places to live.

The Austin skyline as seen looking northwest from the Lakeshore area showing the Roy and Ann Butler Hike and Bike Trail on Lady Bird Lake August 31, 2016. RALPH BARRERA/AMERICAN-STATESMAN
The Austin skyline as seen looking northwest from the Lakeshore area showing the Roy and Ann Butler Hike and Bike Trail on Lady Bird Lake August 31, 2016.
RALPH BARRERA/AMERICAN-STATESMAN

Austin is the nation’s best state capital to live in, according to WalletHub. Their online study compared all 50 capital cities in America and graded them based off of 42 key indicators of affordability, economic strength, quality of education and health, and overall living standards.

More: Why you see so many moving trucks in Austin, according to new report

Those key indicators included things like cost of living, K–12 school-system quality and the number of attractions in the city.

Austin ranked 1st in two categories, the highest number of millennial newcomers (guilty) and lowest premature death rate; and ranked fourth for highest median household income (adjusted for cost of living) and ranked third for “most attractions.” The only two capitals to beat Austin in that last category were Honolulu and Boston, which…OK, that’s fair. One has the beach and the other’s got Fenway Park.

More: Why do readers think Austin is the best place to live – or not?

Austin also ranked 6th in the percentage of adults with a bachelor’s degree or higher. (It’s also a great place for single ladies to find a man with a Bachelor’s degree that’s marriage material, according to one study.)

Funnily enough, Austin didn’t even make the highlights on the “most affordable housing” category. Apparently, it costs a little bit of money to afford a house here, and housing becomes even less affordable when you’re single, according to a new study.

 

 

How much money do you need to make to afford a home in the Austin area?

We’ve all heard before how expensive it is to buy a home in Austin. A new ranking reveals just how much buyers might need to make for a slice of Texas capital property.

A house on Garden Street is for sale on Thursday November 19, 2015. JAY JANNER / AMERICAN-STATESMAN
A house on Garden Street for sale on November 19, 2015. JAY JANNER / AMERICAN-STATESMAN

Business Insider recently ranked the Austin-Round Rock metro area at No. 22 on its list of most expensive housing markets in America. The list ranks the metro areas by the estimated salary needed to purchase a home. In Austin, that magic number is $52,578.

Here’s how the listmakers crunched the numbers, according to Business Insider:

Using NAR’s data on housing affordability, we gathered a list of the US metro areas where the minimum salary required to qualify for a mortgage, with 20% down, is the highest. NAR assumes a mortgage rate of 3.9% for all areas, with the monthly principle and interest payment limited to 25% of income.

According to the National Association of Realtors, in the final three months of 2016 the median home price in Austin sat at more than a quarter of a million dollars — $287,600.

Home prices are even hitting new peak levels in the majority of metro areas nationwide, according to the association.

The American-Statesman reported last month that experts expect 2017 to be a strong year for the Austin-area housing market. Steady job growth and continued demand for homes factor into the high home prices.

Also worth noting: The Austin-Round Rock area is the only metro from Texas on the list. The median home price in the three bigger Lone Star metros are lower than in Austin. In the San Antonio-New Braunfels area, the price sits at $206,300; the Houston-Baytown-Sugar Land area comes in at $224,500; and the Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington area goes for $230,600.

If you haven’t hit the $52,578 salary mark yet, there’s good news. In early February, we also reported that rental rates are stabilizing, providing some relief to apartment dwellers.

Everyone is moving to Texas, according to new report

You know those bumper stickers that say, “I’m not from Texas, but I got here as fast as I can?”

You may be seeing more of those soon.

Longhorn cattle stand in front on a Texas-flag-painted shed on FM 1371 in Chappell Hill on Thursday January 2, 2014. JAY JANNER / AMERICAN-STATESMAN
Longhorn cattle stand in front on a Texas-flag-painted shed on FM 1371 in Chappell Hill on Thursday January 2, 2014. JAY JANNER / AMERICAN-STATESMAN

According to a new report from the Texas Association of Realtors, people are moving to the Lone Star State like crazy. Texas saw a gain of more than half a million residents in 2015, making it one of the states with the highest amount of new residents, second behind Florida. (However, if you subtract the number of Texans who left the same year, the net gain is 107, 689 residents in 2015.)

While we’re talking about bumper stickers, the ones that say, “Don’t California my Texas” also may get more popular. The number one state these new Texans are arriving from? You guessed it: California.

Related: How many Californians are moving to Austin daily?

There is some relief for Austinites, though: More out-of-state residents moved to the Dallas and Houston metro areas than the Austin area in 2015. However, out of all the people who decided to move to Austin in that time frame, most of the new residents came from Houston or Dallas, and the most out-of-state residents came from Los Angeles and New York City.

Related: People are leaving Austin in droves, according to new report

People are leaving Austin in droves, according to new report

You’ve heard the same old song and dance for a few years now — the Austin area is one of the fastest-growing regions in the country, 100-something people move here every day, whatever. We get it. Austin’s great and people want to live here.

The Austin skyline on Tuesday December 16, 2014. JAY JANNER / AMERICAN-STATESMAN
The Austin skyline on Tuesday December 16, 2014. JAY JANNER / AMERICAN-STATESMAN

But a new report from Abodo shows that a massive number of Austinites are leaving the city every day. The report took a look at the 50 most-populated metropolitan areas in the country, and between 2014 and 2015, more than 7 percent of Austin’s population left the metro area for greener pastures. In fact, Austin and Round Rock had the sixth-highest percentage of population leaving town out of the metro areas studied.

Don’t get your hopes up, though — the report also took a look at the cities people are moving into fastest, and Austin-Round Rock came in fourth on that list, with 8.28 percent of the entire population consisting of new residents between 2014 and 2015. And there were no Central Texas cities on the list of cities with the greatest population loss overall, so it doesn’t look like Austin’s bubble is going to burst anytime soon.

Related: What does a day of work at Franklin Barbecue look like? 

Related: Cedar Park ranked among best small cities in America