What did archaeologists digging around the Alamo find?

Hand out photo of the Alamo. -- The Alamo seems spooky enough, but its curator and historian neither acknowledges nor denies ghosts. CREDIT: Richard Nowitz courtesy San Antonio Convention and Visitors Bureau. Received 07/14/11
Hand out photo of the Alamo. — The Alamo seems spooky enough, but its curator and historian neither acknowledges nor denies ghosts. CREDIT: Richard Nowitz courtesy San Antonio Convention and Visitors Bureau. Received 07/14/11

Earlier this month, a team of expert archaeologists set their sites on the Alamo and got to digging. Tearing up sidewalks and closing down surrounding streets in the process, the “systematic archaeological study” was searching for one thing: the historic Texas monument’s original walls.

Well, as the San Antonio Express News reports, although it might not look like much, the team did manage to find part of an adobe wall that would have surrounded the original structure. Or so they’re hoping.

There’s a chance the wall, found about 2 feet beneath the surface, could be a part of another structure from the 1700s that was no longer standing during the 1836 Battle of the Alamo.

There’s still a chance for further discovery. The team plans to dig up to 4 feet deep during the excavation, which is a part of a plan to “reimagine the Alamo” and make it that much easier to remember.

READ: Ozzy Osbourne stops at Texas Capitol on way to make Alamo apology

San Antonio officer dubbed ‘hero’ for saving three children from burning building

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Screen capture via Twitter/@SATXFire

A San Antonio police officer has been dubbed a “hero” by the San Antonio Fire Department for rescuing three children from a fire at an apartment complex on Monday.

According to San Antonio Express News, officer Tim Bowen arrived at the scene before the San Antonio Fire Department and found that four children, ages four to 12, were in their apartment. He called for them to jump down so he could catch them and managed to get three of the children out but the fourth was too scared.

Read: Austin Fire Department wins national award for wildfire mitigation efforts 

SAFD arrived a few moments later and got the fourth child out safely. Cause of the fire is still unknown but officials said it began under “very suspicious circumstances.”

Read: Fire causes $400,000 in damages to Southwest Austin home

Here’s what archaeologists digging around the Alamo are hoping to find

Hand out photo of the Alamo. -- The Alamo seems spooky enough, but its curator and historian neither acknowledges nor denies ghosts. CREDIT: Richard Nowitz courtesy San Antonio Convention and Visitors Bureau. Received 07/14/11
Hand out photo of the Alamo. — The Alamo seems spooky enough, but its curator and historian neither acknowledges nor denies ghosts. CREDIT: Richard Nowitz courtesy San Antonio Convention and Visitors Bureau. Received 07/14/11

An expert team of archaeologists are looking to help make remembering the Alamo that much easier. As the San Antonio Express News reports, this week will mark the start of a “systematic archaeological study” of the pivotal Texas Revolution battle site and historic monument.

The team of experts will begin digging around the Alamo to locate the structure’s original walls. If you’ve visited the Alamo, you might be aware that what stands today represents only a small section of the complex. Archaeologists will have to cut through sidewalk surrounding the mission to uncover the walls that originally helped protect Texas soldiers.

“We want to be able to pinpoint the west wall,” director of the Alamo Endowment Becky Dinnin told KHOU.  “After that, we will pinpoint places where we think the south wall is.”

The excavation is part of a plan to “reimagine the Alamo,” a project expected to be completed in a year. You can keep up with the archaeologist’s work, and street closures in the area, here.

READ: Ozzy Osbourne stops at Texas Capitol on way to make Alamo apology

Tips for making your trip to Schlitterbahn this summer the best one

Cool off a Schlitterbahn New Braunfels. credit: Wendi Poole Promotional hand out photo of Schlitterbahn in New Braunfels which is actually three parks full of water and water rides. Guests take free shuttles to get from one to another. CREDIT: Schlitterbahn Water Park. Received 05/06/08 for 0518WaterParks.
Cool off a Schlitterbahn New Braunfels. Credit: Wendi Poole Promotional hand out photo of Schlitterbahn in New Braunfels which is actually three parks full of water and water rides. Guests take free shuttles to get from one to another.

There isn’t a place in Texas you can have more fun, tube in tow, than Schlitterbahn. But how can you maximize your fun, your wave pool time and your entire park experience? The Houston Chronicle offers some helpful basics, and the American-Statesman has a few more to add. Start with sunscreen, and then check out the rest of these helpful Schlitterbahn suggestions

  • The busy days aren’t always the ones you’d think. As park COO Terri Adams told the Houston Chronicle, “Mondays are a big travel and park day. Often times they can be the second biggest attendance day of the week.” If we lived in an ideal world, we’d all be there on a Thursday.
  • Surf and save/ blast and save days. These special tickets are only available during the beginning and end of the summer season. Although only selected parts of the park are open, they are priced cheaper and ensure an emptier park as kids are back in school. Adult swim!
  • Grab a local bite to eat afterward. The American-Statesman’s Jake Harris recommends Pat’s Place (try the fried pickles), but the surrounding area has much to offer by way of food.
  • Hit the rides hard during lunchtime. Most park visitors will take a break around noon — now’s your chance. While others are snacking, you could be splashing.
  • Picnic lunches are welcome! Never forget that Schlitterbahn is the only amusement park you won’t be dishing out $8 for a soda. Because you can just pack your own!
  • Shoes. Water shoes aren’t going to seem half as lame when they’re protecting the bottom of your feet from what can be a very hot sidewalk.
  • Afternoon ticket discounts. More of a late riser? Keep in mind that the park sells discounted tickets in the later afternoon hours.
  • Shade. Find it and cling to it. Getting to the park a little early will best ensure your chance of securing a spot with shade, which can serve as a much-needed respite from that summer sun.
  • Literally go with the flow. If you’ve ever become trapped in the simulated rapids while tubing through a ride, do not panic. I repeat. Schlitterbahn has a way of moving even the most stubborn tubes along, so don’t worry, and enjoy the ride.
  • Take sun protection as seriously as you do fun. A fun day at Schlitterbahn does not have to end in debilitating sunburn. Lather up!
  • Splurge for that locker. Especially if you’re visiting with a group, you’ll all rest a little easier knowing you don’t need to worry about your valuables.
  • Keep an eye on the weather. Before driving all the way out to Schlitterbahn be sure to double-check the forecast.

Remember your Schlitterbahn trip is nothing if you don’t ride every ride at least six times. Good luck out there!

San Antonio politician ‘welcomes’ Trump with mocking video

Donald Trump was in San Antonio Thursday on his Texas campaign tour, holding a fundraiser at Oak Hills Country Club.

In this April 4, 2016, photo, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump addresses the crowd during a rally at the Milwaukee Theatre in Milwaukee. He won’t be on November’s ballot, but President Barack Obama is slowly embracing his role as the anti-Trump, taking on the Republican front-runner in ways that no other Democrat can. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
In this April 4, 2016, photo, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump addresses the crowd during a rally at the Milwaukee Theatre in Milwaukee. He won’t be on November’s ballot, but President Barack Obama is slowly embracing his role as the anti-Trump, taking on the Republican front-runner in ways that no other Democrat can. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

His visit to the city wasn’t welcome by some of its politicians, especially since Trump’s comments on Hispanics and Mexicans have probably offended the city’s predominantly Mexican-American population. One San Antonio representative went as far as to create a video to “educate” Trump on the contributions of Mexicans to American society.

“Bienvenido a San Antonio, Mr. Trump!” is a just-under-two-minutes video produced by U.S. Rep. Trey Martinez Fischer, and it wears its heart on its sleeve. Narrated by Sen. Joe Bernal (who served in the Texas legislature in the ’60s and ’70s), the video begins with “dump” written underneath Trump’s name in the title screen. And the shade gets thrown harder from there.

“In San Antonio, we value family, hard work, honor and respect. We inherited these values from the immigrants who built our city, and yes, Mr. Trump, that includes Americans of Mexican descent,” Bernal reads.

A highlight reel of Trump’s comments about Mexican immigrants then plays, touching on his “They’re bringing drugs, they’re bringing crime, they’re rapists” statements.

The kicker comes at the 50-second mark, as Bernal says, “While others already told you what to do with your wall”— cue a slide of Rep. Filemon Vela’s “shove [your wall] up your a–” comment— “We would rather give you something you seem to lack— an education.”

The video ends with a promise to Trump that the Mexican-Americans of San Antonio will continue to make their city and their country great again—by voting for Hillary Clinton.

Let the Mexican American history lesson commence.

Watch the full video below.

 

 

Three Austin taco joints make list of ‘greatest’ in U.S.; San Antonio’s not happy

Austin’s taco prowess has once again garnered national merit and regional disdain.

Tina Phan/American-Statesman. 10.4.13. Statesman restaurant critic and reporter reviews several Austin Eats vendors during the first weekend of ACL on Friday, October 4, 2013. Trailer Park taco (fried chicken, green chiles, pico de gallo, lettuce, tomato, cheese), $5, from Torchy's Tacos.
Torchy’s Tacos is one of the Greatest Tacos in America, according to Foursquare users. Tina Phan/American-Statesman.

The foodies of the Foursquare community voted three Austin taco joints onto a list of 50 of the country’s best. Tacodeli and Veracruz All Natural came in at Nos. 6 and 11, respectively, while Foursquarians declared our own Torchy’s Tacos as America’s Greatest Taco Spot.

Foursquare has not been shy with love for our local taco scene in the past, by the way. Velvet Taco and Fuel City from Dallas and Tacos Tierra Caliente from Houston also represented Texas on the list.

RELATED: President Obama stopped at Torchy’s Tacos during his visit to Austin.

Feeling the snub, San Antonio decided it was time to reheat the taco beef between our two tortilla-loving towns. So much for your taco treaty, mayors.

In a story published online Wednesday, the San Antonio Express-News called Foursquare’s voters “misguided” and suggested they “get out more.” Tijerina also accused Torchy’s of taco plagiarism and “lame salsas.” But even he had to admit that our readers’ favorite green chile queso is “tasty.”

Sorry, San Antonio. As far as we’re concerned, the people have spoken. Can we still be friends?

MORE: 11 Austin tacos to try