10 totally Austin Valentine’s Day date ideas

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Still scrambling to find something to do with your true love on Valentine’s Day? Maybe you and your boyfriend or girlfriend have only been dating for a little while, or you aren’t sure how “serious” your relationship is. Check out these ideas of fun ways to save, splurge and have a very Austin-y Valentine’s Day.

VOTE NOW: It’s time to pick the cutest couple in Austin

Kasey Fagan submitted this photo for our “You’re My Butter Half” gallery.

1. Visit a food trailer
You and your sweetie can split a doughnut (or splurge on two) and get a chocolate-and-strawberries fix with the “Dirty Berry” at Gourdough’s on South First Street. Or take your cupcake for a “LuvCake,” featuring chocolate cake and strawberry cream cheese frosting, at Hey Cupcake! at The Picnic park on Barton Springs Road. The West Campus area by the University of Texas is also home to various trucks and trailers for lovebirds to explore.

2. Get your (responsible) drink on
Austin is home to a bunch of craft beer brewpubs located all over the city. Up north, you can have a Peacemaker at the Austin Beerworks taproom and brewery. Over on the east side, order The One They Call Zoe at Hops and Grain. And if your significant other is the light of your life, you might want to head down to Independence Brewing Company, where you can sip on a Power & Light pale ale. Not a beer snob? The Austin area is home to cideries, wineries and distilleries.

Hops & Grain allows brewpub customers to both buy beer to drink on-site, and buy beer to take home. Owner Josh Hare pours a pint. Emma Janzen/American-Statesman

3. Take part in the “sharing economy”
Dabble in Austin’s share of the sharing economy by renting an Airbnb for a mini-staycation, taking a ride-hailing service somewhere so you don’t have to drive or even checking out a B-cycle at one of the city’s 50 stations located in and around downtown.

4. Go on a mural photo tour
Fair warning: This is probably a popular idea anyway, so get ready to see some lines. But if you and your boo are feeling patient, you can show everyone who is your “butter” half near Poquito Street and Martin Luther King Boulevard. Of course, you can stop by the “I Love You So Much” wall at Jo’s Coffee on South Congress Avenue. Or display your “Puppy Love” at the MudPuppies on East Riverside Drive, like fitness writer Pam LeBlanc and her husband, Chris.

Fitness writer Pam Leblanc with her husband Chris at the Puppy Love mural at Mud Puppies on East Riverside Drive.

5. Share your love with the great outdoors
If February is anything like January, keep your fingers crossed for great weather so you can enjoy the fresh air. Try something new, get a backpack of snacks together and head out to the Greenbelt or McKinney Falls and get a little lost together. If clear paths are more of y’all’s thing, a romantic stroll on the boardwalk at sunset is a low-energy alternative and comes with a great view of the Austin skyline by the water.

6. Try and snag a last minute reservation
Best of luck to anyone still searching for the perfect restaurant at which to lovingly stare into another person’s eyes (unless you’re the type of couple that sits on the same side of the table). Restaurant critic Matthew Odam dishes on some Valentine’s Day specials worth checking into. If those don’t work out, he’s also played wingman and hooked us up with a list of romantic places to dine around Austin.

7. Catch a live music show 
Bob Schneider & the Moonlight Orchestra are hitting up ACL Live at the Moody Theater on Wednesday night.

Bob Schneider & Tosca String Quartet performed at the Long Center for the Performing Arts on July 15, 2016. Suzanne Cordeiro for American-Statesman

Not a Schneider fan? Watch The Lucky Strikes at Lone Star Court, Dale Watson & His Lone Stars at Gruene Hall in New Braunfels, The Nightowls at 3TEN ACL Live, or the Peterson Brothers Band and Tomar and the FCs at Stubb’s Austin. And while it’s not quite a live music show, Cirque du Soleil Crystal at the H-E-B Center at Cedar Park will feature the famous live performers on ice.

8. Watch a movie at the Alamo Drafthouse
The Ritz and Village locations will host a Moulin Rouge movie party, complete with props such as blinking rings and glow sticks. The Lakeline and Slaughter Lane locations are hosting a Valentine’s Day feast while screening The Birdcage. The Drafthouse also set up a page on its site featuring links to buy tickets and movie-themed merchandise as gifts.

9. Go shopping
South Congress’ boutiques and shops are perfect for men and women alike, and they feature local brands such as Allens Boots. Prepare for lines, especially at a traditional store where you might get Valentine’s Day gifts, such as the Kendra Scott jewelry shop (hint hint).

Kendra Scott with her husband, Albert Koehler at the Kendra Scott store grand opening, Feb. 10, 2011. (Robert Godwin/American-Statesman)

10. Grocery shop and make your own dinner
Sure, Austin has great places to eat out, but in the city where Whole Foods was founded, why not break out the “Kiss the Cook” apron and whip up something delicious with your partner? Wheatsville Co-op is another option for staying local while you shop. If you go this route, plan ahead and stop by the store before Valentine’s Day. Need inspiration? Check out some great recipes from Austin360’s Addie Broyles over on Relish Austin.

Want more ideas?

Ready for the Republic of Texas biker rally? We’ve got the best motorcycle routes in Central Texas

Last year, Austin Police Chief Art Acevedo, right, greeted bikers at the Republic of Texas Biker Rally parade in downtown Austin Friday June 10, 2016. JAY JANNER / AMERICAN-STATESMAN

The Republic of Texas Biker Rally is this weekend at the Travis County Expo Center in Austin. If you want to take a ride near the city, here are some of the best routes you can take:

The Three Sisters (aka The Twisted Sisters): 131 miles

This 131-mile ride has some of the best scenery you can get. Riding alongside rivers and past Texas ranches, this route is one of the best the Austin-area has to offer. The ride is known for its scenery and road quality and not so much its amenities, but a few can be found along the way.

Devil’s backbone/Old Spicewood: 33 miles

On this 33-mile stretch of scenic road, you’ll get a great view of Balcones Fault. You won’t be going too fast, but the road quality is good and so are the amenities.

Gruene-Fredericksburg-Bandera Loop: 239 miles

Clocking in at 239 miles, this scenic route takes you through the countryside and farmland of Central Texas. For amenities you can stop at Gruene, Luckenbach, Fredericksburg, Kerrville and Bandera, which all have great things to see and do.

Day trip to Luckenbach: 72 miles

This 72-mile trip goes through the Hill Country back roads. If you get hungry, stop at a mom-and-pop burger restaurant called the Alamo Springs Café.

Bikers park their bikes to register for Rot Rally on Friday, June 10, 2016 at the Travis Country Expo Center. This is Rot Rally’s 11th anniversary. Jessalyn Tamez / AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN

South-Central Texas Route 16: 88 miles

If you just want to ride through different towns in the Hill Country, including Kerrville and Fredericksburg, this 88-mile route is scenic with great roads.

Hutto-Granger-Georgetown Loop: 61 miles

This northeast Austin route has good scenery filled with creeks and rives. There are also plenty of curves to ride on. If you are looking for somewhere to eat, there is Louise Miller BBQ in Taylor.

Spicewood Springs Road: 5 miles

Looking for a short ride? The Spicewood Springs has good scenery and road quality. You’ll see some farms with horses and creeks and rivers. Its not a fast road, but you will be able to soak up some Texas beauty.

FM 487: 11 miles

This ride is on the shorter side but it has some nice scenery and good road quality. You’ll be riding through Texas farmland and woods. However, don’t expect there to be many roadside amenities.

Texas Twister: 61 miles

This 61-mile ride has great scenery as you’ll be in Hill Country near the Texas Highland Lakes. The road quality is good, but the road side amenities are not the best.

Hippie Hollow Horror: 40 miles

The Hippie Hollow Horror is 40 miles of great scenery that will take you to the north end of Lake Travis. There are also great roadside amenities with stops in Austin and Four Corners.

Mayor Adler sends tongue-in-cheek response to man upset over ‘Wonder Woman’ screening

Austin Mayor Steve Adler used a witty approach Wednesday in responding to an email he received last week, in which the writer voiced his opposition to the Alamo Drafthouse Cinema’s plans to host two women-only screenings of the movie “Wonder Woman” on Tuesday.

GAL GADOT as Diana in the action adventure “WONDER WOMAN,” a Warner Bros. Pictures release.

The writer called for a male boycott of the entire city of Austin.

“I hope every man will boycott Austin and do what he can to diminish Austin and to cause damage to the city’s image,” he wrote. “The theater that pandered to the sexism typical of women will, I hope, regret it’s [sic] decision. The notion of a woman hero is a fine example of women’s eagerness to accept the appearance of achievement without actual achievement.”

You can read the rest of his musings here – because Adler posted the exchange on his blog – if you’re interested in hearing the writer’s thoughts on makeup, military service, the Olympics, inventors and the “women’s movement.”

Adler decided to alert the writer “that your email account has been hacked by an unfortunate and unusually hostile individual.”

“Please remedy your account’s security right away, lest this person’s uninformed and sexist rantings give you a bad name,” Adler wrote. “After all, we men have to look out for each other!”

In response to the writer’s – possibly rhetorical – request to “name something invented by a woman,” Adler noted that “women invented medical syringes, life rafts, fire escapes, central and solar heating, a war-time communications system for radio-controlling torpedoes that laid the technological foundations for everything from Wi-Fi to GPS, and beer.”

Adler wished the writer luck in securing his email account.

“I hesitate to imagine how embarrassed you’d be if someone thought you were upset that a private business was realizing a business opportunity by reserving one screening this weekend for women to see a superhero movie,” Adler wrote.

This isn’t the first time Adler has used his blog to counteract hostile rants from members of the public. Last year, after voters defeated a referendum on ride-hailing rules that led to Uber and Lyft leaving town, Adler put up a post featuring some of the most profane tweets he had received on the topic. His spokesman said that post “speaks for itself and quite loudly.”

Review this checklist before you hit the road Memorial Day weekend

 

An estimated 2.8 million Texans are expected to be on the roads this Memorial Day weekend, according to AAA Texas. The group anticipates that more than 330,000 drivers will require a roadside rescue – at least 21,500 in Texas alone – AAA Texas spokeswoman Anne O’Ryan said.

So here are some safety steps that O’Ryan says motorists should take if they’re getting on the road this weekend:

  • Have your car battery tested.
  • Make sure your tires are properly inflated.
  • Get plenty of sleep — at least seven hours — so you can stay alert. Drowsy driving accounts for about 20 percent of all crashes, O’Ryan said.
  • “Pack your patience,” O’Ryan said, and drive defensively.
  • Build in extra time for travel.
  • The best times to travel will be early morning, as other times will be more crowded.
  • Take breaks every two hours or every 100 miles.
  • Keep your eyes open for other drivers making sudden lane changes because a lot of out-of-towners and tentative drivers will be on the road.
  • Watch out for motorcycles, bicycles and pedestrians.
  • Don’t text and drive or hold your cell phone.
  • Put your pets on a leash or a cage, and not in the front seat.
  • Wear your seat belt
  • Never drive impaired.

Austin police said officers will be targeting impaired and distracted drivers during the holiday weekend. Under its no-refusal initiative, Austin police will make it harder for a driver suspected of driving while intoxicated to refuse providing a breath or blood sample. If the officer has evidence of impairment, police said, the officer can get a judge’s approval for a search warrant to obtain a blood sample.

The no-refusal effort will be in effect from Friday through June 12 – to include the Republic of Texas motorcycle rally – between 9 p.m. and 5 a.m.

Police said 107 people were arrested last year during the no-refusal period for Memorial Day and ROT Rally.

Interim Austin police Chief Brian Manley recommends that if you do plan to drink, you should have a plan for a ride home. He said the Austin Transportation Department has provided a website, austintexas.gov/gethomesafe, with resources to help you get home safe, including links to Capital Metro services and designated driving programs.

The Williamson County sheriff’s office will be undertaking its own no-refusal initiative, starting Friday and ending Tuesday from 6 p.m. to 4 a.m. each night.

In Hays County, San Marcos police will run its no-refusal program from Friday through Sunday.

 

Austin’s emergency management office lauded, earns elite accreditation

American-Statesman file photo

A national nonprofit group lauded Austin’s emergency management efforts Friday, certifying its program meets 64 industry standards.

Austin is just one of three Texas cities, along with Dallas and Arlington, to win accreditation from the national Emergency Management Accreditation Program.

“Emergency management accreditation represents a significant achievement,” said EMAP Commission Chairperson Robie Robinson in a statement. “We applaud the City of Austin’s leadership and we recognize the dedication to the safety and security of the residents that it represents.”

The city’s 15-member Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Management plans and prepares for emergencies, educates the public about preparedness, and manages grant funding to improve homeland security and public safety. The agency co-manages the Austin-Travis County Emergency Operations Center.

 

Scientists shocked, intrigued by this San Marcos deer chewing on human bones

Deerstare
A deer chews on a human rib bone in San Marcos. Photo courtesy of the Forensic Anthropology Center at Texas State

Warning: This post includes photos of a human skeleton that may be disturbing to some readers.

The land that Texas State University uses to observe how human bodies decompose has led to a recent discovery. But this particular discovery doesn’t have anything to do with humans.

As Texas State scientists observed one deer (or possibly two different ones) pick up a human rib bone with its mouth and casually gnaw on it, “extending from the side of the mouth like a cigar,” they realized they were looking at something unusual, they wrote in a recently published paper. In fact, it was “the first known evidence of a white-tailed deer scavenging human bones,” three Texas State scientists wrote in the Journal of Forensic Sciences.

Deerstare1 13 15
A deer chews on a human rib bone in San Marcos. Photo courtesy of the Forensic Anthropology Center at Texas State

The focus at the Forensic Anthropology Center at Texas State is usually on the human bodies themselves, but the center decided this observation was too intriguing not to share.

“While most forensic anthropologist and taphonomists are aware that carnivorous non-human animals chew on and consume human bones, the fact that ungulate (a.k.a. hooved) species also gnaw on human bone is not as widely recognized,” they wrote.

By the time this deer got to the body – which had been donated for science – it was essentially a skeleton. Many wild animals (but not deer) are known to scavenge human remains on the 26 acres of land that the Forensic Anthropology Center uses to study human decomposition in nature. These scientists use observations such as these to help people like medical examiners who are working to determine, for example, if trauma to a body was caused by a weapon or a raccoon.

“Researchers have observed deer scavenging non-human bone many times in the past, but this is the first time we have observed it with human bones thanks to the unique research happening at the Forensic Anthropology Research Facility at Texas State University,” said one of the scientists, Lauren Meckel. “We were surprised only because we see the deer so often in the photos from our motion-sensored cameras. Usually they walk around the skeleton and sniff it a few times, but never had we seen the deer actually pick up one of the bones.”

DeerRibLateralView
A deer chews on a human rib bone in San Marcos. Photo courtesy of the Forensic Anthropology Center at Texas State

UPDATE: Campus officials confirm unnamed stab victims aren’t Greek-affiliated as flyer tells frats to ‘bash back’

Austinites on Reddit are currently discussing a flyer that was posted on West Campus.

University of Texas officials have confirmed that two victims who were injured as part of a deadly knife attack last week are not affiliated with any of the university’s Greek organizations.

The new details come as students’ fears begin to abate after unsubstantiated rumors that the stabbings were targeting Greek organizations ran rampant last week. The rumors were fueled by a series of acts of vandalism in April, the horror of the May 1 stabbings and a false report of another attack targeting members of Greek organizations.

Fears of violence against Greek organizations found apparent voice once again Monday after a flyer appeared in student-dominated West Campus urging fraternities to form safety squads under the headline: “FRATS BASH BACK.”

University officials said Monday they were aware of the flyer, but were skeptical that students were involved.

Click here to read the full story at MyStatesman.com.

 

Follow Election Day live: Early Hays County voting results are in

 

The Westlake Picayune will not run letters to the editor pertaining to the May 6 election due to a policy implemented to ensure time for any necessary rebuttals.

9:05 p.m. update: Some local history was made tonight, as Bastrop has chosen its first ever woman to be mayor.

In unofficial results, Connie Schroeder will be the city’s next mayor. As the Bastrop Advertiser’s Andy Sevilla reports, Schroeder is a political newcomer who for the past six years has served on the city’s Planning and Zoning Commission.

Schroeder said she is “thrilled and honored” to be Bastrop’s next mayor.

Schroeder

The Advertiser’s Mary Huber snapped a photo of Schroeder chatting with voters earlier Saturday.

8:50 p.m. update: It took a bit, but we got some Hays County results.

In the second largest bond issue of the night, a $250 million pair of bond propositions for the Hays consolidated school district, voters in favor of the bonds are ahead of “against” votes. In the district’s school board races Vanessa V. Petrea is ahead of two candiates for at-large trustee with 40.6 percent of the vote. District 1 incumbent Teresa Tobias leads with 57.14 percent of the vote over two other candidates.

In San Marcos, about 78 percent of voters so far are supporting a $107 million bond package for a new elementary school, renovations and other projects. Incumbent Miguel Arredondo leads the District 1 race school board race with 65.63 percent of the vote. In District 2, incumbent Margie T. Villalpando leads with 55.34 percent of the vote. Less than 5 points separate District 3 incumbent Lupe Costilla (52.42 percent) and Texas State graduate student Mariana Zamora (47.59 percent).

Out near Dripping Springs, residents serviced by Hays County Emergency Services District No. 6 are heavily favoring a quarter-cent hike to the sales tax to build a fire station and buy other equipment. Seventy-two percent of voters have cast ballots in favor of the tax increase.

Meanwhile:

8:20 p.m. update: If there ever was a race to see which election results would go final first tonight (and boy how journalists wish this were real) Bastrop County’s Smithville would have just won.

As the “Always Dreaming” of the night, Smithville’s residence now know that they will see no change to the city’s council and the school district’s board of trustees, as residents voted to re-elect all incumbents.

Meanwhile, we’ve got an Austin City Council Member sighting! Council Member Jimmy Flannigan snapped a tweeted a pair of photos with Cedar Park City Council candidates Heather Jefts and Anne Duffy.

8 p.m. update: It’s been an hour since polls have closed. Let’s have a look at what on how things are shaping up in Williamson County.

In Georgetown, incumbent Mayor Dale Ross has a strong lead against his opponent Sherwin Kahn in the race for mayor with 74 percent of the vote. Another incumbent, Council Member Rachael Jonrowe also has a large lead against challenger Lawrence Romero in the race for District 6. The District 2 race between two newcomers, Valerie Nicholson and David Sray is much closer.

Heading south on Interstate 35, in what is perhaps the most closely watched election of the night, votes in favor of a trio of bond proposals totaling $572 million continue to trail votes against. Round Rock Mayor Pro Tem Craig Morgan is leading in the mayoral race ahead of two other opponents, one of which is a senior at Cedar Ridge High School.

Real estate broker Tammy Young leads the City Council Place 1 race and Incumbent Will Peckham leads in the Place 4 race.

Heading east on U.S. 79 to Hutto, voters so far are favoring Fort Hood firefighter Scott Rose over opponents Dana Wilcott and Steven Harris for Hutto City Council seat in place 1.

And just a bit further east on U.S. 79 in Taylor, Dwayne Ariola was leading against his opponent Gary Gola in the race for the Taylor City Council at-large position being vacated by Taylor Mayor Jesse Ancira Jr.

7:37 p.m. update: Hey hey, Bastrop County results are on the way.

A planning and zoning commissioner is winning so far against a city council member in the race for Bastrop’s mayor while a local business owner is ahead of two other candidates for a seat on the city council.

Meanwhile, in a Bastrop school board race an incumbent has a healthy lead:

Incumbents in a Smithville school board race so far also have the advantage.

7:15 p.m. update: Polls have closed and our first results are in.

Votes in favor of $572 million in bonds for the Round Rock school district are trailing no votes in all three propositions. Round Rock voters in Travis County showed to be voting against the bonds at a greater rate than those in Williamson County.

So far, both of incumbents in the races for the Cedar Park City Council are trailing their opponents.

Meanwhile in Lakeway, incumbent candidates Ron Massa and Bridge Bertram have a slight lead over candidate Tiffany McMillan.

And in Bee Cave:

Incumbent Larry Bradley and agency ombudsman Tony Hanson are leading in their respective races for seats on the Pflugerville school district board of trustees, according to the Round Rock Leader’s Mike Parker.

Earlier: Hi there! Welcome to the Austin American-Statesman’s live blog of today’s local election results in Travis County and other parts of Central Texas.

Throughout the night, we’ll be updating this feed with the latest news as results roll in. Check back in here for updates on what early results are telling us and some sights and sounds from the field. Though no political offices in Austin are up for election, there are numerous amounts of seats across the Austin metropolitan area that will be decided by the tally of votes.

Races include elections for city council seats in Bastrop, Bee Cave, Cedar Park, Georgetown, Hutto, Lakeway, Martindale, Round Rock, Taylor, West Lake Hills. Several propositions are also on ballots, including a tax increase and bond election in San Marcos and a municipal bond in Lakeway for new city facilities.

The big kahuna is a combination of bond propositions for the Round Rock school district totaling $572 million. Outspoken former Austin city council member Don Zimmerman has gotten involved in that race as a leader in a group opposed to the bond.

Check back for results as they come in and updates from our reporters covering these elections. Polls close at 7 p.m., and we expect the first round of results to come in shorty after.

Even in Hawaii, these Texas parents brought the Lone Star state to their baby

You can take the family out of Texas, but you can’t take the Texas out of the family. Even in Hawaii.

With just tamales and a bottle of Big Red, some enterprising parents made their baby Thomas internet-famous.

In Hawaii, thousands of miles away from their beloved Texas, Christina and Javier Sustaita were hosting Javier’s grandmother for a visit. The elder Sustaita apparently makes the “best tamales,” according to Christina, quoted in the Houston Chronicle. While the family didn’t eat the tamales at first, they did the next-best thing: they put the napping Thomas on top of the delicious treats with a bottle of Big Red by his side, and started a photo shoot.

And so a Texas legend was born. Large social media accounts like Texas Humor Twitter and Big Red’s Facebook posted the picture and it went viral. “Parenting: you’re doing it right,” Texas Humor tweeted. “Never too small to enjoy Big Flavor,” posted Big Red, which received almost 1,000 likes.

“I couldn’t believe how many people actually shared the post on their Instagrams as well, so that was really awesome,” the new mom said, who took the pictures. Our hats go off to her.

h/t: Houston Chronicle

President Trump: Here are 5 things you should know about Andrew Jackson

President Donald Trump (Kevin Hagen/The New York Times)

President Donald Trump – whose public admiration of former President Andrew Jackson is well-known and evident by the portrait he keeps of the 7th president in the Oval Office – said in an interview on Monday that he believed Jackson could have prevented the Civil War.

Trump’s analysis quickly drew criticism for its apparent historical illiteracy about Jackson’s life and tenure in the White House or the causes of the Civil War. So let’s consider it our patriotic duty to help the president know at least five actual things about Andrew Jackson:

1. Andrew Jackson died on June 8, 1845, at his plantation in the slave state of Tennessee.

Trump had told Zita: “I mean, had Andrew Jackson been a little bit later, you wouldn’t have had the Civil War.” Most crit

President Andrew Jackson, the 7th president on the U.S. (AP Photo, file)

iques of Trump’s quote snarkily point out that Jackson couldn’t have stopped the Civil War because it started about 16 years after he died.

But let’s give Trump the benefit of the doubt and assume he meant, “Had Jackson been born later, he could’ve stopped the Civil War.” That, however, brings us to the next point: Jackson fiercely supported a strong union and central government. How much? To the point of preparing military action against South Carolina in 1832.

2. Jackson once dispatched Navy warships into Charleston Harbor to put a stop to talk of secession.

The Nullication Crisis of 1828 arose when Congress passed high tariffs designed to protect Northern industry, but Southern planters believed the taxes ultimately hurt their cotton trade. When the South Carolina Legislature voted to nullify the federal tax as well as a subsequent lowering of the tariffs in 1832, Jackson sent Navy ships into Charleston and threatened to hang anyone working to support nullification or secession. His vice president, John C. Calhoun of South Carolina, soon resigned to become his state’s U.S. senator.

Based on Jackson’s history in office, and the additional crises that erupted between North and South over the next 30 years, it’s unlikely Jackson would have been able or would have even wanted to stop the Civil War.

3. Jackson was nicknamed “Old Hickory” because he was as tough as the wood that they used to beat people with.

Trump said of Jackson: “He was a very tough person, but he had a big heart.” The Native Americans he evicted from their tribal homelands in Florida and Georgia would tell a different story. After Jackson signed the Indian Removal Act of 1830 into law, more than 45,000 Native Americans were relocated to the West during his administration.

4. Jackson hated the Electoral College.

Although Trump continues to trumpet his own electoral college win, his idol Jackson repeatedly lobbied Congress to abolish the Electoral College, likely because of the “corrupt bargain” struck during the election of 1824 that denied him the presidency in his first run for the White House. Jackson had won the popular vote, but he didn’t have a majority in electoral votes in the race with John Quincy Adams. The election was thrown to the U.S. House led by Speaker Henry Clay. Jackson lost the vote, and President-elect Adams made Clay his secretary of state. Jackson was elected president outright in 1828 with 56 percent of the popular vote.

5. In one of his last acts as president, Jackson formally recognized the Republic of Texas.

But Jackson held off on recognizing the Republic of Texas, which had legalized slavery, until after the election of 1836 to increase the chances that his vice president, Martin Van Buren, would win. Jackson wanted to avoid making slavery a bigger issue in the 1836 campaign, so Jackson didn’t recognize Texas until the last full day of his presidency, March 3, 1837.

Before the interview with the Washington Examiner’s Salena Zito even aired on SiriusXM satellite radio, a partial transcript highlighting the Jackson quote appeared online, courtesy of Politico correspondent Edward-Issac Dovere on Twitter.