Map shows how Texas’ prevalence of obesity compares to the U.S.

Looks like our Southern love of sweet tea, barbecue and pie comes at a cost — a new report found that our region has the highest prevalence of obesity in the U.S.

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The report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention uses a series of maps to illustrate the prevalence of self-reported obesity across all 50 states in 2015. Across the board, the data shows that no state had a prevalence of obesity less than 20 percent. The CDC defines a person with obesity as an adult who has a body mass index — which is a measure of an adult’s weight in relation to his or her height — of 30 or higher. 

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Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System

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Across the board, the data shows that no state had a prevalence of obesity less than 20 percent. In total, Texas’ obesity prevalence was between 30 and 35 percent, putting us in line with 20 other states. Which states had a higher prevalence of obesity? Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi and West Virginia.

For more maps and an extensive breakdown of the data, go here.

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