5 things to know today: $91 million in TV ads reserved against Trump

Hillary Clinton listens as a speaker described her struggle with substance abuse during a panel discussion in Charleston, W.Va., May 3, 2016. Indiana’s presidential primaries are being held Tuesday, with 92 delegates to be assigned on the Democratic side. (Ty Wright/The New York Times)
Hillary Clinton listens as a speaker described her struggle with substance abuse during a panel discussion in Charleston, W.Va., May 3, 2016. Indiana’s presidential primaries are being held Tuesday, with 92 delegates to be assigned on the Democratic side. (Ty Wright/The New York Times)

Here’s what you need to know to start off your weekend informed:

1. $91 million advertising assault awaits Trump.

Hillary Clinton’s leading super PAC Priority USA has reserved around $91 million to go toward television advertising that will begin next month and last through the entirety of the election, the Associated Press reports. The ads, many of which will cast Republican rival Donald Trump in a negative light, will test his proven ability to thrive when targeted with attack ads.

2. Austin police release new drunk driving numbers ahead of Prop 1 election.

Ahead of this Saturday’s vote, the Austin Police Department released numbers that show the city hasn’t seen a major drop in the number of drunk driving-related incidents since ride-hailing services began in Austin, contradicting statistics released by Uber and Lyft showing the opposite, the American-Statesman’s Nolan Hicks reports.

3. Images capture devastation of burning Canadian city.

The extent of the damage caused by the Fort McMurray still ongoing wildfires is captured in these images compiled by BBC. The fire has ravaged around 328.2 sq miles and required the city’s almost 90,000 residents be evacuated earlier this week.

4. Unlike father, Kim Jong Un to speak publicly during party congress.

Despite being an “omnipresent dictator”only one of Kim Jong Il’s public statements was ever recorded, as he rarely gave public speeches. His son Kim Jong Un, however, is expected to give a speech during this weekend’s formalization of his leadership at North Korea’s first party congress held in nearly 40 years, NPR reports.

5. Will this bird delay an Austin highway?

Tweet. A major South Austin highway project could be delayed by one endangered bird’s song. Austin biologists reported hearing the golden-cheeked warbler in the proposed area in April, a finding that could require habitat protection, the American-Statesman’s Asher Price reports.

Ted Cruz may have lost the primary, but he won the war for viral fame

He turns from the podium. He hugs his wife. He turns to embrace his father, and in doing so, first accidentally punches said wife. Then he elbows her in the face. When U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas ended his bid for the presidency Tuesday, he didn’t just end a campaign. He ended a streak of Internet meme gold.

Republican presidential candidate, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, hugs his wife, Heidi, and his father, Rafael, following a primary night campaign event, Tuesday, May 3, 2016, in Indianapolis. Cruz ended his presidential campaign, eliminating the biggest impediment to Donald Trump's march to the Republican nomination. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)
Republican presidential candidate, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, hugs his wife, Heidi, and his father, Rafael, following a primary night campaign event, Tuesday, May 3, 2016, in Indianapolis. Cruz ended his presidential campaign, eliminating the biggest impediment to Donald Trump’s march to the Republican nomination. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

Breaking news alerts gradually gave way to GIFs of Heidi Cruz’s facial distress.That pugilistic moment competed for Twitter timeline space with serious news analysis of Cruz dropping out of the Republican race. It was fitting that the senator’s campaign would eke out one more viral moment as the Grim Reaper came.

Cruz’s stunted road to the White House was pockmarked with buzzed-about awkwardness and almost as many attempts to counteract it with pre-fab memes. Which were, for better or worse, just as awkward.

A brief highlight reel of Cruz’s most viral moments:

And that’s not even touching on some of the former candidate’s jarring interactions with others, the subject of much online conversation — daughter Caroline fleeing from his embrace on the trail; college roommate Craig Mazin continually roasting him on Twitter; former U.S. Speaker of the House John Boehner referring to him as “Lucifer in the flesh”; and a spidery and flailing hand-clasp with Carly Fiorina, his Hail Mary pass of a running mate.

Donald Trump may have soundly defeated Cruz in the political world. But online, the race for dominance was far closer, at least until last week.

5 things to know today: Sanders to stay in race despite probable Clinton win

FILE - In this July 30, 2015 file photo, Democratic presidential candidate, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., waves after speaking at a rally with registered nurses and other community leaders celebrate the 50th anniversary of Medicare and Medicaid, on Capitol Hill Washington. With the Obama administration counting down its final year, many Democrats are finding less to like about the president’s health care law, unsure about its place among their party’s achievements. Sanders’ call for “Medicare for all” seems to have rekindled aspirations for bigger changes beyond “Obamacare.” That poses a challenge for Hillary Clinton, who’s argued that the health care law is working and the nation needs to build on it, not start over. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
Democratic presidential candidate, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., waves after speaking at a rally with registered nurses and other community leaders celebrate the 50th anniversary of Medicare and Medicaid, on Capitol Hill Washington. With the Obama administration counting down its final year, many Democrats are finding less to like about the president’s health care law, unsure about its place among their party’s achievements. Sanders’ call for “Medicare for all” seems to have rekindled aspirations for bigger changes beyond “Obamacare.” That poses a challenge for Hillary Clinton, who’s argued that the health care law is working and the nation needs to build on it, not start over. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

Here’s what you need to know to stay informed this Thursday:

1. Bernie Sanders says he’s still in.

In a Thursday episode of “Morning Edition,” Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders told NPR that he plans to stay in the race until the final primary and believes that his decision will be good for the party because it increases “the level of political activity.” Sanders also admitted that his path toward winning the nomination was “narrow.”

2. North Korea to hold biggest party meeting in 36 years.

North Korea will hold its first party congress in nearly 40 years when the country’s elite political figures meet in Pyongyang Thursday, at which time Kim Jong-un is expected to announce the country’s nuclear weapon capabilities, Vice reports.

3. George W. Bush will not endorse in presidential race.

Both former president George H.W. Bush and son George W. Bush have confirmed that they do not plan on endorsing Donald Trump as the Republican nominee in the presidential race, The Texas Tribune reports. George W. Bush has endorsed the Republican nominee during each of the last five elections.

4. We’ve got your 2016 ACL lineup right here.

Who can you expect to see at this year’s 15th anniversary of the Austin City Limits Music Festival? The lineup was released early this morning and includes headliners Radiohead and LCD Soundsystem. Check out the full list here.

5. Today you’ll learn…

The “Today I Learned” portion of entertainment and news site Reddit has a few interesting and bizarre facts about Austin that you may or may not be better off knowing. Flip through the gallery here. You just might learn something.

5 things to know today: What went wrong for Cruz and right for Trump

 

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump addresses the media and a few supporters after winning the Indiana primary, on Tuesday, May 3, 2016, in New York. (Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times/TNS)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump addresses the media and a few supporters after winning the Indiana primary, on Tuesday, May 3, 2016, in New York. (Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times/TNS)

Here’s what you need to know to start off this Wednesday informed:

1. How did we get here?

Last night’s news that, following Donald Trump’s sweep in the Indiana primary, Ted Cruz would drop out of the 2016 presidential race and Trump will most likely clinch the Republican nomination, might have you wondering exactly where Trump went right and Cruz wrong. Politico takes a close look at the failings in Cruz’s campaign, and the Hill has a timeline guiding you through the moves that landed Trump the leading spot in the GOP race.

2. Wildfire forces mass evacuation in Canadian city.

All of Canadian city Fort McMurray’s 80,000 residents were forced to evacuate last night due to a raging, unchecked wildfire that was expected to worsen with Wednesday’s hot, dry forecast, Reuters reports. The fire in the oil sands town was estimated to have consumed around 6,540 acres.

3. Facebook pays 10-year-old $10,000 for exposing Instagram flaw.

Toying around on Instagram earned one 10-year-old his age in thousand of dollars after he discovered and reported a flaw in the app that allowed users to delete any comment, including those made by other users, the Washington Post reports. Facebook has paid some $4.3 million to other researchers who have reported similar failings.

4. Early voting for Prop 1 wraps up with heavy turnout.

Voter turnout for Austin’s Proposition 1 could wind up surpassing 20 percent of Travis County’s registered voters, or around three times what the last May municipal elections garnered, the American-Statesman’s Ben Wear reports. Early voting closed Tuesday ahead of the May 7 election day.

5. Changes to look out for on MoPac tonight.

Lane and ramp configurations on North MoPac will change Tuesday night in a move that is expected to affect Wednesday morning rush-hour traffic, the American-Statesman’s Katie Urbaszewski reports. The same number of lanes will remain open.

Just how much money does it take to live comfortably in Austin?

The complaints about Austin’s cost of living are well-known, but according to a new list released by gobankingrates.com, it could be a lot worse.

The money management site compiled a list measuring the 50 most populous cities in America, and then checked to see how much money it would take to live comfortably in each of them.

A shot of downtown. Photo via iMaerial
A shot of downtown. Photo via iMaerial

The list cross-checks the population with the average median household income, and then uses the 50-30-20 budget rule (50 percent for essentials, 30 percent for discretionary spending and 20 percent for savings) to see if the average median income can sustain that city’s cost of living.

According to this method, Austin has a median household income of $55,216 but only $53,225 is required to live comfortably, according to the 50-30-20 rule. By that formula, if you’re an Austin resident making more than $55,000, you’ll have a little over $1,000 left to spend at the end of every year.

Other Texas cities didn’t fare so well. Houstonians, with a population of 2,239,558 and an average median household income of $45,728, actually need to make $60,795 a year to live comfortably in the Space City. Dallas residents need a yearly income of $55,651 to live comfortably in a city of 1,281,047, but the average resident only makes $43,359.

Check out the full list here.

Watch: Taylor Kitsch Lyft ad asks voters to join him in supporting Prop 1

“Four more please,” Taylor Kitsch tells the barkeep after finishing off a beer in his new ad for Lyft. At that rate “Friday Night Lights” bad boy Tim Riggins has every reason to find a safe ride home, and he doesn’t miss a beat in letting you know what it’ll be.

“You see ride-sharing is a lot like me; it’s beautiful,” Kitsch tells the camera. “It makes going out in Austin fun and safe again.” Under the dim and familiar lights of Ginny’s Little Longhorn Saloon, he proceeds to casually open a folder on his phone labeled “Ridesharing” and request a Lyft.

“Prop 1 is a vote people are going to talk about for years to come. So vote for Prop 1,” Kitsch says before hopping in a car and directing his driver, “To Dillon.” Kitsch also spent some time on UT’s West Mall earlier this week posing for pictures with fans in front of a “Vote for Prop 1” backdrop.

The Prop 1 debate has been complicated by confusing ballot language and an jaw-droppingly expensive campaign led by corporations Lyft and Uber. To get a better sense of the issue and what your vote means read the American-Statesman’s Q&A here. And don’t forget to ask yourself what really matters when you step into that voting booth: What would Coach Taylor do?

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Watch Kitsch break down the differences between Texas and his native Canada below.

5 things to know today: Possible outcomes in tonight’s GOP primary

INDIANAPOLIS, IN - MAY 02:  Republican presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) greets people during a campaign rally at the Indiana State Fairgrounds on May 2, 2016 in Indianapolis, Indiana. Cruz continues to campaign leading up to the state of Indiana's primary day on Tuesday.  (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
INDIANAPOLIS, IN – MAY 02: Republican presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) greets people during a campaign rally at the Indiana State Fairgrounds on May 2, 2016 in Indianapolis, Indiana. Cruz continues to campaign leading up to the state of Indiana’s primary day on Tuesday. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Here’s what you need to know to stay informed today:

1. A guide to the possible outcomes in tonight’s primary.

According to analysis by FiveThirtyEight there are three possible outcomes in tonight’s Indiana GOP primary: Donald Trump, polling at 46 percent, wins the state and accordingly, probably the nomination; as was originally projected, Ted Cruz takes the culturally conservative state, proving the Trump train can be stopped (or at least slowed); an ambiguous result would both show Trump has not won over the majority of the Republican party, while simultaneously fueling Trump momentum stories. Read more about what’s expected tonight here.

2. U.S. serviceman killed by ISIS in Iraq.

An American serviceman was killed after ISIS fighters broke through Kurdish defense lines in northern Iraq, NPR reports. Two other Americans have been killed during the war against ISIS.

3. Prop. 1 ad on third of Austin cabbies gives only a fraction of story.

As the American-Statesman’s Ben Wear reports, a Ridesharing Works for Austin ad claiming “One-third of fingerprinted Austin taxi and chauffeur drivers failed Uber’s tough background check process,” doesn’t quite tell the whole story. Of the 53 drivers who applied to work for Uber and failed the background check, only 19 had been convicted of “serious crimes.”

4. President Obama not offended by Larry Wilmore’s language at White House Correspondents’ Dinner.

For those who were concerned, White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest has said that President Barack Obama was not offended by comedian Larry Wilmore’s use of the “n-word” during his White House Correspondents’ Dinner speech Saturday, the Washington Post reports. Earnest said Obama “appreciated the spirit of Mr. Wilmore’s expressions on Saturday night.”

5. Tiff’s Treats plans first location outside of Texas.

You no longer have to be in Texas to get a sweet Tiff’s Treats delivery. The fast-growing business has announced its plans for an Atlanta location to debut this June, the American-Statesman’s Gary Dinges reports.

5 things to know today: Starbucks lawsuit seeks $5 million for too much ice

ORG XMIT: NYBZ121 FILE - In this July 20, 2009 file photo, a Starbucks customer drinks a beverage outside Starbucks, in Beverly, Mass. Starbucks Corp. is expected to release a quarterly earnings report at the close of the market Wednesday, April 21, 2010. (AP Photo/Lisa Poole)
In this July 20, 2009 file photo, a Starbucks customer drinks a beverage outside Starbucks, in Beverly, Mass. Starbucks Corp. is expected to release a quarterly earnings report at the close of the market Wednesday, April 21, 2010. (AP Photo/Lisa Poole)

Here’s what you need to know to start off your week informed:

1. Too much ice could cost Starbucks.

What’s a little extra ice cost? If one Illinois woman is successful in her lawsuit against coffee giant Starbucks, about $5 million, Time reports. Stacy Pincus has brought a lawsuit against the chain claiming it purposefully underfills cold beverages and deceives customers about the amount of ice and liquid they’re receiving.

2. Retired firefighter brings complaints against city council members in code compliance war.

When his efforts to bring Austin City Council’s attention to major failings in code enforcement weren’t enough, retired firefighter Dale Flatt decided to try something new. As the American-Statesman’s Andra Lim reports, Flatt has filed code complaints against council members and their noncompliant property to try to get his “foot in the door so I can go talk.”

3. Australian claims to be Bitcoin creator.

Australian tech entrepreneur Craig Wright revealed to BBC that he has access to blocks of bitcoins thought to be created by the founder of the digital currency, who has gone by the name Satoshi Nakamoto, as proof that he is its creator. Reuters reports that not everyone is convinced. The Economist, which was denied further proof of Wright’s claims, says it”may never be possible to establish beyond reasonable doubt who really created bitcoin.”

4. Malia Obama to attend Harvard after taking gap year.

She’s made her decision, but Harvard is going to have to wait. President Barack Obama’s daughter Malia, who was 10 years old when the family first moved into the White House, announced plans to attend Harvard in 2017 after taking a gap year, Slate reports.

5. Showers possible throughout the day.

Austin is kicking off the month of May in unseasonable fashion. According to the American-Statesman’s Robert Villalpando’s forecast, scattered showers are possible throughout Monday and will be accompanied by below-average temperatures, with an evening low of 53 degrees.