5 things to know Friday, April 1: Women accuse U.S. soccer federation of wage discrimination

The United States Women's National Team celebrates with the trophy after they beat Japan 5-2 in the FIFA Women's World Cup soccer championship in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, Sunday, July 5, 2015. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

The United States Women’s National Team celebrates with the trophy after they beat Japan 5-2 in the FIFA Women’s World Cup soccer championship in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, Sunday, July 5, 2015. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

Here’s what you need to know to start your weekend off informed:

1. Women accuse U.S. soccer federation of wage discrimination.

Five soccer players from the World Cup-winning U.S. women’s team have filed an action with the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission accusing the U.S. Soccer Federation of wage discrimination, the Associated Press reports. The women revealed they are paid nearly four times less than players on the U.S. men’s national team, based on a financial report. Alex Morgan, Carli Lloyd, Megan Rapinoe, Becky Sauerbrunn and Hope Solo area all being represented by the same law firm. In a statement Solo said, “the USMNT get paid more just to show up than we get paid to win major championships.”

2. Loss for Trump in Wisconsin would greatly reduce chances of meeting delegate count.

The results coming out of next Tuesday’s presidential primary in Wisconsin are expected to have a major effect on the Republican party, the Associated Press reports. A loss for front-runner Donald Trump could greatly reduce his chances of gaining the delegates he’ll need to secure the nomination, and a win for opponent Ted Cruz could offer hope to those who see Trump as a threat to the party. Currently, polls show Trump holding at 30 percent approval rate in Wisconsin — a percentage that earned him a lead last month. “We don’t take too kindly to people who act the way Donald Trump acts,” said state Rep. Jim Steineke.

3. Fenves vows faster response after UT student alleges racial attack.

University of Texas President Gregory L. Fenves wrote an open letter stating that there is a “need for us to improve our policies, particularly with incidents of hatred and violence,” following a student’s report that he was targeted during a racially motivated attack, the American-Statesman’s Marty Toohey reports. Cody Young says Tucker Sauer and Lucas Henderson shouted racial slurs at him from a West Campus balcony, threw a bottle at him and then threatened violence after Young said he was going to call police. UT officials say the changes in policy will expand on methods already used to handle sexual assault allegations.

4. Blue Bell continues recovery, says it has boosted food safety.

Almost a year after the listeria outbreak that was linked to the deaths of three consumers, Blue Bell Creameries says it has updated food safety regulations to prevent a similar occurrence, the American-Statesman’s Claudia Grisales. A report to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration made public last week, shows the changes Blue Bell has made to its regulations, including screening of finished products and testing procedures. A drain was found to be the specific source for the outbreak at the company’s Oklahoma plant, but it was unable to identify one for its Brenham plant.

5. Austin wakes up to storms; today’s forecast.

Many Austinites woke up to thunder, lightning, slick roads and even some reports of hail this morning, the American-Statesman’s Robert Villalpando reports. These thunderstorms are expected to continue today in parts of Central Texas and the Hill Country, but the sky should clear tonight promising a sunny and mild weekend. Austin energy also reported outages Friday morning.

Reader Comments 0

0 comments